Sign In  |  Register  |  About Corte Madera  |  Contact Us

Corte Madera, CA
September 01, 2020 10:27am
7-Day Forecast | Traffic
  • Search Hotels in Corte Madera

  • CHECK-IN:
  • CHECK-OUT:
  • ROOMS:

Veterans detail combat stories on National Purple Heart Day, sharing importance of recognition

Three veterans discussed the importance of National Purple Heart Day on "Fox & Friends," given that many Americans today apparently don't think positively about the military.

August 7 is National Purple Heart Day — a day to commemorate and honor our service members who were wounded in combat while making the ultimate sacrifice for the United States of America. 

Three veterans joined "Fox & Friends" on Monday morning to discuss the importance of the day and what it means to them. 

Dan Clarino served in the U.S. Marines during the Vietnam War. He was injured twice within six weeks — earning two Purple Hearts. 

WORLD WAR VET, 101, ‘FINALLY WALKS’ AT GRADUATION 80 YEARS AFTER HAVING TO MISS CEREMONY AMID GLOBAL WAR

He revealed why National Purple Heart Day matters so much, as it started in his hometown of Newburgh, New York.

"George Washington gave that first Purple Heart, which actually was a patch that they sewed on in the Revolutionary [War]," he said. 

The Purple Heart was designated as the Badge of Merit in 1782 by Washington.

It was originally given to soldiers for merit-like actions, according to the Disabled Veterans National Foundation. 

It was revived in 1932 and 1944 and is now the Purple Heart, known for honoring those who have been wounded or who died in combat. 

Clarino said he was wounded twice while serving in the Vietnam War. 

"I had shrapnel hit me between the eyes in July … and then about four weeks later in August, I actually had a bullet go through me," he said. 

Clarino said he is grateful he’s able to see and walk after his injuries. 

"I thank God every day for that," he said. 

VETERAN WHO LOST LEG IN AFGHANISTAN IS SURPRISED WITH MORTGAGE-FREE HOME: ‘A GREAT HONOR’

In July 2013, Matthew Zuniga was serving in the Air National Guard in Iraq and Afghanistan when an improvised explosive device went off underneath his vehicle. 

On "Fox & Friends," he talked about his injury — including how he broke four bones in his back. 

"I could barely walk for weeks on end, and I spent a good amount of time in Walter Reed recovering from that," he said. 

Zuniga said he feels "blessed and fortunate" to be alive. 

Dan D’Angelo served in the U.S. Army during Vietnam in 1968. He was drafted right out of college — four to five months later landing in the middle of the war. 

He joined "Fox & Friends" to discuss his injury from an explosion that left three shrapnel holes in his arm.

"Everything lit up … It was insane," the Purple Heart recipient said.

When asked how they felt about only 60% of the country having a positive feeling toward the military, Clarino said he feels sorry for that. 

"I know that the environment and the politics has helped to cause that," he said.

"We live in a different time."

Zuniga said it breaks his heart to know that 40% of people don’t have a positive feeling about the military. 

"To the people that sign up every day, and they do it selflessly and make the sacrifice, they do it for the 60% that appreciates this country and what it stands for," he said. 

To commemorate the national day, Indiana is sending the largest group of Purple Heart recipients to Washington, D.C., on an Honor Flight. 

The group of 102 Purple Heart recipients took off Monday morning from Fort Wayne, Indiana, and will return to a special welcome home ceremony on Monday evening. 

The Honor Flight Northeast Indiana is a nonprofit organization that honors veterans with a trip to Washington, D.C. 

Of the 102 recipients on the flight is Henry Shull — a veteran who served in Vietnam for 14 months and received two Purple Hearts. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

His daughter, Krystal Shull, told Fox News Digital that she and her sister are grateful that he is on the trip.

"My sister and I are so grateful he got this opportunity and can’t wait for him to finally get the welcome home he deserved," she said. 

The trip was made possible by Federated Media’s WOWO Radio’s local charity, Penny Pitch, which chose the Honor Flight of Northeast Indiana as the 75th annual recipient. 

The flight was funded by community donations totaling over $207,000. 

Fox News' Krystal Shull contributed to this report. 

Data & News supplied by www.cloudquote.io
Stock quotes supplied by Barchart
Quotes delayed at least 20 minutes.
By accessing this page, you agree to the following
Privacy Policy and Terms and Conditions.
 
 
Copyright © 2010-2020 CorteMadera.com & California Media Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.